Are you still thinking of Elvis knocking on your door?

by Lou

How do you get your prospects off the comfortable Fence of Indecision and on to Fast Action Street?

One way to give them a mighty shove is by planting a thought they didn’t know they had. . . or to pace what they’ve been thinking all along.

A powerful language pattern that can do both is a presupposition with a Change of Time Adverb. Once they read or hear this language pattern, no matter what they were thinking before, they will think of what you just said.

THE PATTERN:

Are you still thinking of [WHAT YOU WANT THEM TO THINK or ACTION YOU WANT THEM TO TAKE]? [CONSEQUENCE AND/ OR BENEFIT].

SOME EXAMPLES:

• “Are you still thinking of buying NLP Language Patterns for Advertising to increase your sales?

• “Are you still thinking of taking an NLP Training?” [from NLP Comprehensive]

• “Are you still thinking of flying Continental Airlines to Paris this summer?

This advertising language pattern is useful for prospects who are undecided about buying because you are pacing their indecision.

You may also want to pace the reasons why they’re hesitating. This depends on your market of course, but it could be anything from price (too expensive). . .to the belief that they won’t be able to do what you suggest. What are some of the reasons prospects are reluctant to buy in your particular market? Like this…

• “Are you still thinking of buying Finster Prize toys for your children this Christmas? Our toys are produced in limited number in America. We use no imported parts or paint.” (This paces objections or hesitations.)

You can also lead into a major benefit after the language pattern:

• “Are you still thinking of buying a HAL 9000? They make the perfect babysitter. The perfect companion on long trips.”

Depending on what you are selling or how you feel, you can follow with a consequence:

• “Are you still thinking of buying stock in Skynet? This might be your last chance to buy at these prices before they skyrocket.

It’s also a great pattern to use in a follow-up mailing or for any autoresponder emails after the first one or two have been sent.

* As I was writing this post, I realized that this presupposition is the one used in the old joke, “Are you still beating your wife?” No matter how a person responds, it doesn’t look good.

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