The Holographic Endorsement Language Pattern

by Lou

The Concept: Since the brain is attracted to and delighted by the novel and we tend to buy when we recognize an important DIFFERENCE among all similar offers, the Holographic Endorsement Pattern is an ideal pattern to cut through the clutter of other’s advertising messages and really hit home with a difference.

It’s a powerful metaphor that uses the combination of two well-known positives to create an unforgettable endorsement of a business that creates delightful pictures in prospects’ minds…and a tickled-pink brain USUALLY buys.

If this sounds like something you can use, proceed this way:

1. Think of how you want your business or product to be represented. What positive attributes do you want to have associated with what you’re selling? You want something “solid”, so choose a nominalization. For example, honesty, precision, power, wisdom, etc. You need at least two.

2. Now who or what represents these positive attributes? These can be famous people, animals, places, businesses, archetypes, etc. You need someone or something that most people know and recognize.

3. What two people, animals, etc. from step two above, if combined, would best represent your business? You want something that creates a powerful, somewhat unusual image.

HERE’S THE PATTERN:

[SOMEONE/SOMETHING/COMPANY POSITIVELY ASSOCIATED TO YOUR FIELD or POSITIVE METAPHOR] meets/plus [ANOTHER POSITIVE THING, PERSON, or METAPHOR]

AND HERE ARE SOME EXAMPLES:

• “Milton Erickson meets Madison Avenue” (NLP Language Patterns for Advertising)
• “La Grenouille meets McDonald’s” (McBurgertown)
• “Google meets Sherlock Holmes” (Bing)

This pattern is similar to the common positioning statement: The (EXPENSIVE, VALUABLE, NOTED PRODUCT) of (FIELD YOUR PRODUCT IS IN) (“The Rolls Royce of Ipecac Syrup“). However, the holographic endorsement pattern creates new images in your prospects’ minds. This is such a great pattern that has many uses (just don’t use them all at once).

You can use this pattern as a headline, an unattributed testimonial, or a self-testimonial. It’s also good for blurbs and tag lines.

And this pattern can also be used to put down the competition (“McDonald’s meets E.Coli” – Krusty Burger). I wouldn’t recommend doing that though.

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